Sunday, 21 August 2016

Derby Brickworks - part 2

In part 2 of Derby Brickworks, I cover the brickmakers who operated in the rest of Derby. 


Normanton.

I start with a brickworks which was known as Melbourne Junction, Normanton Brickworks & Sinfin Lane. This works was next to the railway at Melbourne Junction & is recorded on maps as the Normanton Brickworks on Sinfin Lane, Normanton.
As I do not have exact dates for some of the brick makers who worked at this site, they may not be displayed in the correct timeline.


 © Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1900.

Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

As wrote in part 1 John Holmes had been in the partnership of Bennett, Holmes & Kay, then briefly on his own at Stockbrook Lane before moving to Melbourne Junction around 1877. I do not have any trade directory entries for John at this works only the census listing in 1881 recording him as a brickmaker & as wrote in part 1 may have taken up brickmaking as early as 1872 because in the 1871 census he is recorded as grocer & flour dealer.

It appears Thomas Bennett then takes over this yard & Thomas is recorded in Kelly's 1881 edition at Sinfin Lane. This is the only trade directory for Thomas at this works & it is also his last. As yet no bricks have turned up made by Thomas at this works.

 Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

John Walley junior is next recorded at the Normanton works in Kelly's 1891 edition.


Reading/Normanton brick photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.


I do not have any information or trade directory entries for Mr. Reading at the Normanton works, but the 1913 O.S. map reveals that this works is no long shown. So the date when Reading was at this works is unknown. 



Spondon.

 © Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1881.

On the Spondon O.S. map above dated 1881 I have coloured the three brickworks which are on this map, of which one is marked disused. 
Although I do not have proof of the ownership of these yards, I think that the yellow works was owned by Richard Bennett at this date & the blue disused works had been owned by Richard's father Thomas Bennett when he was in partnership with Henry Leese with Bennett & Leese being recorded at Spondon in 1876. This leaves the red works & I have two entries in Kelly's 1876 & 1881 editions for the Antill Brothers brickmaking at Spondon & this may have been their yard. As yet no bricks have been found with Antill Brothers stamped in them.



Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.



Chaddesden Hill.

© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1900.

Charles Dyche is listed in Kelly's 1855 & White's 1857 editions at Chaddesden Hill, Derby. Although I do not know the exact location of Charles Dyche's brickworks at Chaddesden Hill in 1855, I have used the 1900 map above to show a later brickworks owned by the Derby Kilburn Colliery Company which was also situated on Chaddesden Hill. So Charles' brickworks may have occupied the same or a close by site. Where it says Cowsley on the map above the 1880 map reveals a pond/area of water which may have been Charles' clay pit ? 



This Chaddesden brick, photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby has Dyche stamped on the other side, but unfortunately I did turn the brick over to photograph it. Then a fellow collector photographed the same brick & this has revealed that it has got the same stamp mark as the Dyche brick above which I have got in my collection, but mine has not got Chaddesden on the reverse.


There is the possibility that because of the texture of the clay this Derby brick & the D brick below were also made by Charles Dyche. I have also found a J. Dyche is listed in Kelly's 1855 edition at 51 Sitwell Street, Derby & Sitwell Street is in nearby Spondon. So this J. Dyche may have lived at this address & then worked with Charles ?




I now move on to the Derby Kilburn Colliery Company who's brickworks was also on Chaddesden Hill.



The Derby Kilburn Colliery Company was formed in 1893 & in doing so took over a colliery at Stanley called the Stanley Kilburn Colliery previously owned by the Small Brothers who went bankrupt in 1885. It may have been from this colliery's name that Derby Kilburn Colliery Company took part of it's name from. The company then expanded by opening the Footrill drift mine which was to the south-west of Manor Farm in Stanley. They used Stanley Kilburn pit to vent air into & pump water out of the drift mine. D.K.C.C. then built their own tramway from the drift mine to Chaddesden Hill from where their coal was conveyed to Derby. It may have been after this tramway was up & running that DKCC then opened their brickworks at Chaddesden Hill & the works is shown on the 1900 OS map above at the terminus of the tramway. Bricks were made using clay shale from the mine in beehive kilns & some of these bricks where used to build four semi-detached houses at Klondyke on the edge of Stanley village. By 1918 D.K.C.C. had closed their brickworks & Stanley pit due to financial difficulties & I have found that the Footrill drift mine had already been taken over by the Mapperley Colliery Company in December 1908. 


© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1900.

The 1900 map above shows the distance the tramway travelled from the Footrill's drift mine near Stanley village to Chaddesden Hill. It must have been a feat of engineering to build this tramway. Also coloured yellow is Stanley Kilburn Colliery. If you wish to study this map in more detail I have pasted the link below.
http://maps.nls.uk/view/101601561

Also if you wish to read more details about this amazing tramway, please follow the link below. 
http://www.chaddesdenhistoricalgroup.co.uk/2014/04/derby-kilburn-colliery-company/




Chellaston.

© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, surveyed 1879/81.

In Wright's 1874 edition Birch & Ryde are listed as plaster pit owners & may have owned the California gypsum mine marked just to the right of the brickworks on the 1879 map above. It is in Kelly's 1876 edition that we find that Birch & Ryde are listed as brick & tile manufacturers at Chellaston. As you can see on the map above there is no clay pit next to the works, so as well as bringing coal to the works via their tramway, B & R must have also brought clay to the works via road & then their tramway. As to where the clay came from whether it was from their gypsum mine or a 2nd option is the unmarked (at this date) clay pit with tramway which I have coloured blue, is unknown. If they did own the blue coloured area, it appears that they did not own the land between the clay pit & the brickworks, so therefore they had transport the clay by road & then by their tramway to the works. A later map does show that the next owners of the works did have direct access to this clay pit.

  B & R's brick & tile where both photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.




I have no trade directory entries for A. Clews at Chellaston, so at what date he operated in Chellaston is unknown, but he may have followed B & R at the works. Also as there is only one marked brickworks on maps in Chellaston, I am taking it that it was the same works. The only reference to the Clews name that I have found is for a Thomas Clews & family & Thomas is recorded as farmer in Chellaston between 1860 & 1895. Now Thomas had a son called Arthur L. Clews & he is recorded as a brewers clerk at the aged of 17 in the 1871 census, could he have taken up brickmaking at a later date ? It's my only option.

 A. Clewes/Chellaston brick was photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby by Frank Lawson.


© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1899.

As you can now see on the 1899 map above the tramway has gone & the works has direct access to the clay pits, some of which are marked as old clay pits by 1899. 
So the next brickmaker to be recorded at Chellaston is T.P. Stableford in 1881 & he must have been responsible for extending the clay pits at the works.


Thomas Porter Stableford is listed in Kelly's 1881 edition to it's 1916 edition at Chellaston. So Stableford's company must have produced millions & millions of bricks during it's 36 years of production, hence the size of the clay pits. If you look at the 1899 map above you will see a house marked Woodlands next to the brickworks, this is where Thomas Stableford lived. These clay pits where also known as Woodlands Brickpits.


 Both Stableford bricks where photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

Photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby by Frank Lawson.


© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, surveyed 1937/8.

I have found in a gypsum mine article that Chellaston Minerals were to later follow T.P.Stableford at the Woodlands Brickworks sometime after 1916, but it may have not been until 1928, the year when the company is first listed in Kelly's Directory with Mr. J.E. Williamson as Managing Director. 
Bricks were in great demand during both World Wars especially the 2nd as the company had to keep a sufficient stock of bricks to rebuild Rolls Royce in case of major damage by enemy bombs.  
While digging for clay, gypsum was also dug & was sold to produced plaster by the company. The gypsum mine article states that the gypsum on this site had run out by 1965. The company continues to be listed in the brick & tile makers section of Kelly's Directory up to it's 1941 edition & the brickworks closed in 1977. 



If you wish to view a 1937 photo of the works on Picture the Past, I have pasted the link below.
http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php?keywords=Ref_No_increment;EQUALS;DMAG000714&pos=2&action=zoom



Shelton Lock, Chellaston.


© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, surveyed 1879.

Thomas Cooper is recorded as brickmaker in White's 1857 edition at Shelton Lock, Chellaston with George Shelton listed as manager. This brickworks is only shown as old clay pits on the 1899 map, so it may have only been in production for a few years.


 T. Cooper/Shelton brick photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.




Weston Underwood.

© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, surveyed 1880.

James Miller is listed in Kelly's 1864 to 1887 editions at Weston Underwood, Derby. 
More can be read at the link below about James, his family & his brickworks in this blog written by one of his descendants Brett Payne who lives in New Zealand. A very interesting blog which requires more time to read his many posts about Derbyshire towns & it's inhabitants. The posts include many old photographs which is his passion. 
http://photo-sleuth.blogspot.co.uk/2008/11/james-miller-1815-1893-drainage-man.html





Duffield.


© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, surveyed 1879/80.

I have been unable to find a brickmaker in trade directories with the initials of I.J. at Duffield, but I have found Samuel Jennens & Son recorded as brickmakers in Kelly's 1876 edition at Duffield, Belper. So I expect I.J. is more than likely the son.



Photos by MF, courtesy of the Frank Lawson collection.



I wish to thank the following people for their help & use of their maps & photos.

Silk Mill Museum, Derby - for giving me access to their brick collection & permission to use my images in this post.
http://www.derbymuseums.org

National Library of Scotland & Ordnance Survey - use of their maps.

Frank Lawson - photos.














Sunday, 14 August 2016

Derby Brickworks - part 1

In part 1 of Derby Brickworks I concentrate on the brickmakers who operated in the Uttoxeter Road area of Derby. On the 1882 surveyed O.S. map below, I have numbered each of the brickworks that I will write about in this post. Then I conclude the post with information on the Derby Brick Co. which took over three of these yards. I have to note that some of the information found has been sketchy, so theories which I believe are well founded have been put forward.

 © Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey, Published 1886, Surveyed 1882.

Yard 1 - Slack Lane.

The Slack Lane brickworks was owned by the Bennett family & I have wrote about this family who worked at various brickworks across the Midlands in my Bennett post, please see link below.
http://eastmidlandsnamedbricks.blogspot.co.uk/2014/09/bennett-brickmakers-in-derby-nottingham.html

So in this post I concentrate on the Bennett's that worked at Slack Lane. This brickworks had it's access via Slack Lane which connected to Uttoxeter Old Road & in some trade directories this brickworks address is given as Uttoxeter Old Road & with the works also having access through Yard 2, Rowditch on to Uttoxeter New Road, there are some trade directory entries giving the address Uttoxeter New Road or Uttoxeter Road. I have to note that all of these address' refer to the Slack Lane Works coloured yellow on the map above. 



My first trade directory entry that I have found for Thomas Bennett is in Glover's 1849 edition at New Uttoxeter Road, then in Freebody's 1852 edition at Slack Lane. There is the possibility that Thomas may have established his brickmaking business before 1849. Thomas next appears in White's 1857 edition at Slack Lane & then in Kelly's 1864 edition at Uttoxeter New Road. As said all these address relate to the Slack Lane works. 

We next find that at a date unknown but before October 1871, Thomas Bennett is in a partnership with Henry Leese in the company of Bennett & Leese & their works is listed as being on Uttoxeter Old Road. Thomas died in October 1871 & Bennett & Leese was then was run by Thomas' son Richard & Henry Leese until Henry left the partnership to establish his own brickmaking business in 1881 at the Rowditch Brickworks next door (Yard 2). Richard Bennett is then listed in the same Kelly's 1881 trade directory as owning the Slack Lane works in his own name. Richard continues to run the works until his death in 1887. Kelly's 1887 edition then records Mrs Bennett as running the company. 

We then find in Kelly's 1891 edition that the entry for this works is now Richard Bennett & Co. Research has revealed that this Richard Bennett from nearby Kings Newton had been a brickmaker & he is recorded in Kelly's 1881 edition at Kings Newton. Richard had come to Derby to take over the running of the Slack Lane brickworks & to established his brick making machine & engineering business called Bennett & Sayer. Although I do not know the family connection, it must have been close with this Richard being given the control of the previous Richard's company.
Richard Bennett & Co. continues to be listed in Kelly's up to it's 1904 edition. Then further research has revealed that the Slack Lane works continued to produce bricks under the ownership of the engineering company, Bennett & Sayer. 1932 sees the sale of the works to the Derby Brick Company which had been formed in 1908. The works is listed with three other brickworks owned DBC until the last Kelly's trade directory in 1941. When the Slack Lane works closed is unknown & today this former brickworks site forms part of the Kingsway Retail Park.


Yard 2 - Rowditch.

The Rowditch brickworks had been started by Joseph Harpur who is recorded in the 1841 census as brickmaker at Rowditch Farm on Uttoxeter Road. The works had been built on land next to the Harpur family's 18th century farmhouse. Joseph is then recorded in Bagshaw's 1846 edition at the works. After Joseph had passed away in 1853, his son John took over the works & John is listed in Kelly's 1855 edition & White's 1857 edition as being in the partnership of Tomlinson & Harpur at the Rowditch works.



We next find that this partnership had ended & John Harpur is running the works on his own & he is listed in Kelly's 1864 & Wright's 1874 editions at the Rowditch works. 


Both Harpur bricks where photographed at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

Henry Leese is next recorded as brickmaker at the Rowditch brickworks in Kelly's 1881 edition. Henry had been in the partnership of Bennett & Leese at the Slack Lane works next door (Yard 1). First with Thomas Bennett then with his son Richard. This solo venture did not last long as Henry is recorded in a 1885 London Gazette notice about the dispersal of Thomas Bennett's assets as deceased & had been a executor in Thomas's will. Up to yet no bricks have been found with just Leese stamped in them.

Joseph Tomlinson is next listed as brickmaker at the Uttoxeter Road works (Rowditch) in 1891. Joseph Tomlinson may had been a descendant of the Tomlinson who had been in the partnership of Tomlinson & Harpur at the Rowditch works as recorded in 1855 & 1857. Joseph's works entry in Kelly's 1895 edition is now given as Rowditch, Uttoxeter Road. There is also the addition of Duke Street. I have found that Duke Street is next to the river & on an 1882 map it shows coal wharfs are located on this street, so it looks like Joseph owned one of these wharfs in 1895. Joseph continues to be listed in Kelly's up to it's 1904 edition at Rowditch & Duke Street. 
Kelly's 1908 edition only records Joseph at Duke Street & we next find in the same directory that the Rowditch works along with the California brickworks on Stockbrook Street are now owned by the newly formed Derby Brick Company. As yet no bricks have been found with Tomlinson of Derby stamped in them. 
The Derby Brick Co. continues to be listed in Kelly's at the Rowditch brickworks up to the last available trade directory in 1941. The year the works closed under DBC is unknown, but today the site along with the former Slack Lane brickworks site forms part of the Kingsway Retail Park. 


Yards 3 & 4 - Stockbrook Lane/Street.

Stockbrook Street as we know it as today was previously called Stockbrook Lane & Lane appears in trade directories up to 1887. Research has revealed that the site of Yards 3 & 4 started as one yard then changed to two. Next there was a change of ownership at both yards. Then one yard was sold to the owner of the other yard. Then after both yards had been operated as one under one owner, the works changed hands again of the final time. The buildings shown in Yard 4 were demolished & the area became the clay pit for Yard 3 between 1908 & 1913. Also to note is that the Stockbrook Street works was also accessible from Spring Street as shown on an 1937 aerial photograph from Britain From Above which I use later in the post under the Derby Brick Co. 



 Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

First of all I have to say that this Thomas Bennett is a different Thomas Bennett to the one that owned the Slack Lane works (Yard 1) & died in October 1871. 
Bennett, Holmes & Kay are listed at the California Brickworks, Stockbrook Lane in Kelly's 1876 edition. This is the only entry for the trio, but they may have been at this yard as early as 1872. 
We next find that the works is divided into two & new buildings & kilns are erected as shown on the 1882 map above with Thomas Bennett owning the California works - Yard 3 & John Holmes owning Yard 4.  



 Holmes/Derby brick, photos taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.


I have found from a family website that John Holmes is recorded in the 1871 census as Grocer & Flour Dealer. Then in the 1881 census John is recorded as brickmaker & living on 81,Uttoxeter New Road. So I take it that John had taken up brickmaking before 1876 & it may have been as early as 1872 when he joined Bennett & Kay in their partnership at Stockbrook Lane. I do not have any trade directory entries for John on his own at Stockbrook Lane & this solo venture may have only lasted a few months before he moved to another yard at Melbourne Junction (Sinfin Lane, Normanton) & I write about that works in my next post, Derby Brickworks - part 2.
Yard 4 is then owned by James Kent & I write about him later in this post.



Bennett/California brick, photos taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

With photographing this brick with California on the reverse Thomas Bennett was at this works (Yard 3) possibly from 1876/7 up to 1880/1. We next find Thomas recorded as working at another yard on Parcel Terrace (Yard 5) in 1881 & I write about that yard later. The California Brickworks is then taken over by Edwin DuSautoy in 1881 & I write about him later in the post.


  Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

I now go back to 1876 when James Kent had taken over Yard 4 from John Holmes & James Kent is listed in Kelly's 1876 & 1881 editions at 5 & 6 Ashbourne Road (office or home) & works Stockbrook Lane. 
With Edwin DuSautoy then taking over Yard 3 in 1881 it may not have been long after 1881 that James Kent then sold his yard to Edwin DuSautoy, with Edwin then running both yards side by side.




Two more examples of Kent's bricks.

  Photo by Frank Lawson, taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

Edwin DuSautoy is first listed in Kelly's 1881 edition as owning two brickworks one on Parcel Terrace, Uttoxeter Old Road which I write about later & the California Brickworks on Stockbrook Lane. Edwin is next recorded in Kelly's 1887 edition as only owning the California Brickworks & this works is now listed as being on Stockbrook Street. This entry for the Stockbrook Street works continues up to Kelly's 1904 edition.
I have found a reference on the web dated 1900 that George DuSautoy, a brick & tile manufacturer along with local solicitor, William Hollis Briggs purchased some land from the executors of George Wheeldon's estate to build the houses which is now Wheeldon Avenue, Statham Street & White Street. So with this information I take it that George had taken over the running of Edwin's company by 1900.






Kelly's 1908 edition now recorders that the Derby Brick Co. were the owners the California Brickworks & I write about this company at the end of this post.


Yard 5 - Parcel Terrace.

This works looks fairly established with it's own railway siding on the 1882 map above, but I have only been able to find two brickmakers recorded in trade directories as working at this yard & both in the same year, 1881.
I think Thomas Bennett who had previously been at Stockbrook Street was the first to work here & may have been there before 1881. Thomas is listed in Kelly's 1881 edition at Parcel Fields, Slack Lane. Now I have found from the web that Parcel Terrace is shown on a 1852 map as an unmarked road locally known as Peg's Row with twenty cottages built along it's north side. At the end of these cottages Parcel Fields is marked on the map. Thus confirming Thomas's trade directory address as being at this works. As yet no bricks have been found made by Thomas at this yard. Thomas is then recorded as operating another works at Sinfin Lane, Normanton in 1887 & I write about that works in my next post, Derby Brickworks - part 2.

As said Edwin DuSautoy is also recorded in Kelly's 1881 edition at Parcel Terrace & this is the only entry for Edwin at this yard. How long Edwin worked this yard is unknown, but the works is no longer shown on the 1900 O.S. map & part of this site appears to now belong to the Rowditch Brickworks owned by Joseph Tomlinson. Today the former Parcel Terrace works is part of the Kingsway Retail Park.

Before I leave Yard 5 I have an entry in White's 1857 edition for Joseph Gascoyne & Son & they are listed as working on Uttoxeter Old Road. This entry could refer to this brickworks as I do not have anyone working at this yard at that date & as said this works looks fairly well established on the 1882 map. Also Parcel Terrace is accessed off Uttoxeter Old Road.



 Gascoyne/Derby brick, photos taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.







Yards 6 & 7 - Both Slack Lane.

I have grouped these two brickworks together because I do not have firm evidence to which of the two brickmakers I have information for as working at which yard, but from my findings I believe Bemrose & Son where at Yard 6 & the Slater Brothers where at Yard 7.

Bemrose & Son are listed on Slack Lane in Kelly's 1881 edition with Thomas Cooper as manager. There is only this one entry for company & with me finding that the 1900 O.S. map shows houses fully built on this site, this finding has drawn the conclusion that Bemrose owned Yard 6. There is the possibility that this Bemrose & Son are the same company as the well known printing firm, Bemrose & Son of Derby.

So I am putting Yard 7 as being owned by the Slater Brothers, William, Henry & Joseph. The brothers are listed in Kelly's & White's directories in the brick & tile manufacturers section from 1857 at Slack Lane & these entries continue up to the 1895 edition. With this works closing shortly after 1895 this date coincides with the 1900 O.S. map which shows that the works still has some buildings standing, but is marked disused. Therefore resulting in my conclusion that the Slater Brothers owned Yard 7. No bricks have been found with Slater of Derby stamped in them only bricks made at their other works in Denby which are stamped Slater Denby. The Slater Brothers were primarily sanitary pipe & wares manufacturerers at both their works & only produced bricks for their own & local use. The Brothers also operated a builders yard on Uttoxeter Old Road from where that did general house repairs & some new build, more than likely using there own bricks.

If you wish to read more about the Slater family, please follow the link to my Slater post.
http://eastmidlandsnamedbricks.blogspot.co.uk/2015/02/william-drury-lowe-denby-terra-cotta-w.html



Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.

With this brick being stamped Slack Lane there is the option that either Bemrose & Son or the Slater Brothers were the maker of this brick. 

Before I leave Yards 6 & 7 I have an entry in Kelly's 1876 edition for the Derby Brick Co. Ltd. on Slack Lane with George Freeborough as manager. There is the option that DBC may have been at Yard 6 occupying this site before Bemrose & Son in 1881. Also with there only being this one entry for DBC at this date I believe that there is no connection to the 1908 DBC which I am going to write about next.


Derby Brick Company.

The Derby Brick Company is listed in Kelly's 1908 edition at the California Brickworks, Stockbrook Street & the Rowditch Works on Uttoxeter Road. The California B/W's had last been owned by Edwin DuSautoy & the Rowditch B/W's by Joseph Tomlinson. So who owned DBC ? 




From my findings I have deduced that the DuSautoy family were possibly the owners & main share holders of DBC. My first finding was the 1900 article stating that George DuSautoy was a brick & tile manufacturer in 1900 & had taken over the running of the company from Edwin. Then the 1921 edition of the Derby & District trade directory names the same George DuSautoy as manager of DBC at Stockbrook Street & residing at Warwick Avenue, Littleover.


 © Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1900.

I have used the 1900 map above to first show how the Rowditch works (purple) had taken over part of the Parcel Terrace works when owned by Joseph Tomlinson & then to show the Rowditch works & California Works (green) owned by DBC in 1908. The Slack Lane works (yellow) was still owned by Bennett & Sayer in 1908.

DBC continue to be listed in Kelly's at their California & Rowditch brickworks up to the 1932 edition when there is the addition of two more brickworks, Slack Lane (Yard 1) & Aston on Trent which opened in 1931. It appears that the Slack Lane works was purchased off Bennett & Sayer in early 1932 & a new works was established at Acre Lane, Aston on Trent.



The SL denotes the Slack Lane works.




© Crown Copyright. Reproduced with permission of NLS/Ordnance Survey 1913.

I have used the 1913 map above to show how the Stockbrook Street works (green) had altered since the 1900 map. Buildings which where originally in Yard 4 have gone & have been replaced by a clay pit which can be seen in the 1937 Britain From Above photograph below. Also to note in this photo was that the works was also accessible via Spring Street as well as Stockbrook Street & check out the depth of the clay pit in 1937, it's really deep. I would have not wanted to walk around the edge of this clay pit in the dark ! 




DBC continues to be listed in Kelly's trade directories until the last edition in 1941 at Rowditch, Slack Lane & Aston on Trent. Kelly's 1936 edition was the last entry for the California B/W's on Stockbrook Street. This works may have closed by 1940 & the last remains of the works were demolished in 1961. I have added this link to Picture the Past - 
http://www.picturethepast.org.uk/frontend.php & if you enter Stockbrook Street in the search box you will get 5 photos of when they demolished the works chimney in 1961.
The Aston on Trent works closed in 1941, ten years after it had opened. The Slack Lane & Rowditch works may have also closed around this date due to men going to fight in WW2. As said the Slack Lane & Rowditch sites are now the Kingsway Retail Park & the Aston on Trent site is now being used for the extraction of aggregates by Hanson's.



I have one last entry for Derby to tell you about, but I have not been able to establish if this company had a brickworks in Derby. The entry in Kelly's 1864 & 1876 editions is for T. Roe & Son, Siddals Road, Morledge & Exeter Street, Derby & Hanford, Stoke on Trent. From old maps I have established that the buildings & yards which where on Siddals Road backed on to Derby Canal & it was to here that T. Roe delivered his Hanford Stoke on Trent made bricks by barge for distribution around Derby. Exeter Street was more than likely his Derby office where bricks could be ordered from. So in conclusion T. Roe only sold & distributed his bricks in Derby. If any evidence of him owning a brickworks in Derby does turns up, it will be added to the post at a later date.
Below is a T. Roe brick which I photographed at the Silk Mill Museum in Derby.


Photo taken at the Silk Mill Museum, Derby.



I wish to thank the following people for their help & use of their maps & photos.

Silk Mill Museum, Derby - for giving me access to their brick collection & permission to use my images in this post.
http://www.derbymuseums.org

National Library of Scotland & Ordnance Survey - use of their maps.

Britain From Above - photo.

Frank Lawson - E. DuSautoy brick photo.